Revised February 25, 2006, July 29, 2007 and November 5, 2007
Copyright 1998-2007 by John W. Allen







NEWS ARCHIVES



Hello and welcome to our News archives.

In this section you will find several newspaper clippings regarding the occurrence and use of visionary mushrooms in Alabama.
They are arranged alphabetically by newspapers and then Chronologically by dates.




Texas
A page devoted to newspaper clippings from Texas



 

http://www.amarillo.com/stories/112504/new_679629.shtml

Man charged in drug case

The 47th District attorney's office filed charges Tuesday against an Amarillo man accused of having a variety of illegal drugs in his home.

The district attorney's office Tuesday filed three counts of possession with intent to deliver a controlled substance and another charge of possession with intent to manufacture and deliver a controlled substance against Jason David McCain, 23, of Amarillo.

The complaints allege that after police executed a search warrant on McCain's apartment Saturday morning, they found a half-pound of Psilocybin mushrooms, 2 grams of methamphetamines, 199 grams of cocaine and 220 grams of Ecstasy.

According to the complaint, McCain reportedly provided Amarillo officers with a written statement saying the drugs were his.

McCain's girlfriend also provided a statement alleging that he had been selling drugs from the apartment, the complaint said.

McCain was in Potter County Detention Center late Wednesday in lieu of $705,000 in bonds.






 
February 09, 2005 5:58 PM EST

AMARILLO, Texas - Authorities doubt Cupid had any part in the 9 pounds of heart-shaped candies discovered during a traffic stop.

The candies, found Monday by Texas Department of Public Safety troopers, tested positive for psilocybin, a psychedelic drug extracted from a mushroom of the same name.

The estimated value of the faux Valentine's Day chocolate was more than $408,000, DPS officials said in a news release.

The troopers found the candy in a plastic bag after stopping a San Francisco man's 2005 Toyota Corolla on Interstate 40 about three miles west of Amarillo.

Craig Allen Moreland, 30, was arrested and taken to the Potter County Detention Center on drug charges,
the release said.


you can take the vine out of the jungle but you can't take the jungle out of the vine. amen.



 

HoustonChronicle.com
  2-10-2005

AMARILLO - Authorities doubt Cupid had any part in the 9 pounds of heart-shaped candies discovered during a traffic stop.

The candies, found Monday by Texas Department of Public Safety troopers, tested positive for psilocybin, a psychedelic drug extracted from a mushroom of the same name.

The estimated value of the faux Valentine's Day chocolate was more than $408,000, DPS officials said in a news release.

The troopers found the candy in a plastic bag after stopping a San Francisco man's 2005 Toyota Corolla on Interstate 40 about three miles west of Amarillo.

Craig Allen Moreland, 30, was arrested and taken to the Potter County Detention Center on drug charges, the release said.




 

theeagle.com

Texas?  Where in Texas.

 

Raid nets 4 arrests, $8,000 in drugs

A Friday evening raid in College Station netted more than $8,000 in drugs and put four people, including two local college students, behind bars.

All four lived in a house on the 1100 block of Taurus Circle.

Police said they found about 5 ounces of high-grade marijuana and 22 ounces of psilocybin mushrooms in the house.

Three of those arrested face felony charges of manufacturing or delivering a controlled substance. Matthew White, 18 and Isaac Fortner, 21, are both delivery drivers, according to police records. Christopher Denton, 21, is a student at Texas A&M.

The fourth person, a 20-year-old Blinn student, faces misdemeanor possession of marijuana charges.

Police said they found the drugs while searching the house and cars parked out front.



 

The URL for the missing article below:

www.timesrecordnews.com/trn/local_news/article/0,1891,TRN_5784_2955247,00.html

 

Times Record News Police seize millions in drugs

Sizeable mushroom bust said to be one of biggest on record

By Jessica Langdon/Times Record News
June 11, 2004

Investigators look over psilocybin mushrooms seized during a search Tuesday in Clay County. Officers seized a total of 25 pounds during their investigation.

Mushroom Seizure by the Numbers

Psilocybin mushrooms seized: 25 pounds

Dosage units: 1.13 million

Total value: $11.35 million

Drug officers from several agencies made a rare find in Clay County this week.

They made a mushroom bust bigger than anything the North Texas Drug Task Force has seen before.

Investigators Tuesday turned up 25 pounds of psilocybin mushrooms - hallucinogenic drugs - with a street value topping $11 million.

One Clay County residence housed 21 pounds of the mushrooms, investigators said.

"We were kind of amazed at the value," Wichita Falls police Sgt. Cindy Walker said.
Investigators said if it wasn't the largest seizure of its kind in North Texas, it was one of the largest.

Wichita Falls undercover officers, Department of Public Safety narcotics officers and the Clay County Sheriff's Department conducted the investigation.

Task Force Investigator Chris Taylor said the probe started after an arrest in Dallas-Fort Worth several weeks ago produced some information.

One person was arrested in Wichita County, he said, and another arrest was pending in Clay County.

"It was involving the mushrooms that were being grown in the Petrolia area that were going to other parts of the state," Taylor said. He said officers tracked distribution all the way to Austin.

Joe Ben Patrick, 53, of Clay County was charged with unlawful delivery or manufacture with intent to deliver a simulated controlled substance in connection with an incident June 8. His bond was set at $10,000, and he was not being held Thursday in the Wichita County Jail.

There is no field test for psilocybin mushrooms, and investigators are waiting for results of other tests, which is why the charge addresses a "simulated controlled substance."

The arrest affidavit gave this description of the incident:

Someone cooperating with the investigation arranged to have 3 pounds of mushrooms delivered.

The person who delivered those mushrooms also cooperated, saying he's bought mushrooms in the past from the suspect in this case. He said that's where the 3 pounds of mushrooms he delivered came from.

That witness arranged with the suspect to have 1 pound delivered, the affidavit said. That led to the search warrant in Clay County, a press release from the Wichita Falls Police Department stated. Officers found "where the psilocybin mushrooms were being cultivated," the release stated. They seized the mushrooms and hauled the evidence away in bags and glass jars. The jars filled a roomful of shelves.

"I think we made a significant dent," said Jim Blake, a DPS narcotics investigator, "even though we didn't know we were having the problem."

Taylor said drug officers - used to working with drugs like methamphetamine - haven't had that many run-ins with mushrooms. He's only seen a few cases in nearly 10 years.

"I've even seized some from people on the streets before," Sgt. Walker said - but never anything of this magnitude.

"We were very lucky that day," Blake said.

Crime reporter Jessica Langdon can be reached at (940) 763-7530 or by email at langdonj(at)TimesRecordNews.com.

Copyright 2004, Times Record News. All Rights Reserved.

Edited by cerealrat (06/18/04 07:22 AM).



 

Another followup article

 

KFDX NEWS CENTER CHAnnel 3:

 

www.kfdx.com/news/default.asp?mode=shownews&id=5531 DRUG BUST SETS RECORD
Friday, June 11, 2004

A Clay County man is out of jail after what is believed to be the largest illegal mushroom bust, possibly in the entire state of Texas. It happened Tuesday, about 5 miles northwest of Petrolia, off FM 810. Officers say at least 25 pounds were found inside a trailer, worth more than $11 Million. Joe Patrick is charged with delivery of a simulated controlled substance. Patrick is out on a $10,000 bond. The North Texas Drug Task Force, DPS, Wichita Falls` Organized Crime Unit, and the Clay County Sheriff`s Office all worked the bust.

And next, a rebuttal from Miss Langford. About her first article.




 
http://www.timesrecordnews.com/trn/local_news/article/0,1891,TRN_5784_2972302,00.html

Numbers for drug bust not accurate
Computing error led to overestimation of mushroom doses seized

By Jessica Langdon/Times Record News
June 18, 2004

A calculating glitch appears to have caused the dollar amount to mushroom into the millions on a major psilocybin mushroom bust in North Texas.

The 25 pounds of mushrooms seized last week were worth only a fraction of the money authorities originally believed, police said.

The original figure topped $11 million. The North Texas Regional Drug Task Force said that amount was about 25 times too high.

The Task Force, the Wichita Falls Police Department's Organized Crime Unit, Department of Public Safety narcotics officers and the Clay County Sheriff's Department worked together on the investigation. They say the mushroom distribution operation stretched from Wichita Falls to Austin.

The investigation resulted in a large find - 21 pounds of mushrooms - at a Clay County home June 8. Officers also seized a few more pounds from other related incidents, they said.

Drug investigators originally thought the 25 pounds of mushrooms held 1.13 million dosage units, making them worth $11.35 million.

Those are the numbers the DPS computerized reporting system came up with, WFPD Sgt. Cindy Walker said.



But that magic $11 million number didn't go with the magic mushrooms after all - a glitch in the reporting system caused it to calculate the figures as it would for LSD, instead, Walker said. The system separates LSD and "other hallucinogenic drugs," DPS narcotics investigator Jim Blake said after the bust.

Walker said something went wrong in the calculation, and the dosage unit used to determine the value of psilocybin mushrooms is a quarter of a gram. That would add up to 45,400 dosage units in this case instead of more than 1 million. The lower number makes the total value closer to $454,000 at $10 per dosage unit, Walker said.

The Drug Enforcement Agency uses ounces as a basis for figuring out value, and the agency said the prices vary. The United States Department of Justice's Web site says psilocybin mushrooms generally sell for $20 per [ of an ounce, and for $100-$150 per ounce.

Eating the mushrooms causes hallucinations and affects the senses, the DEA reported. It said the drugs can make colors seem brighter and create a mixing of senses like "hearing a color." The drug can also make it hard to tell the difference between fantasy and reality. They're not as popular as many other drugs, the agency said, but they do pop up where young crowds gather - college campuses, parties and raves.

Investigators said the mushrooms were cultivated at the Clay County residence. Officers have made one arrest so far in the local case.

Joe Ben Patrick, 53, of Clay County was charged with unlawful delivery or manufacture with intent to deliver a simulated controlled substance in connection with the June 8 incident. Bond was set at $10,000. He was free from the Wichita County Jail Thursday.

Investigators were still looking into the incident and expected to make another arrest in connection with the case.

Crime reporter Jessica Langdon can be reached at (940) 763-7530 or by email at langdonj(at)TimesRecordNews.com.



The url listed above to the page for this story has also been removed from the papers online news service. She also had a followup story between her first release and her correctred version about how college kids were beginning to discover the use of magic mushrooms. She is not well versed in the history of drugs or drug use. And her only crime is her lack of drug related knowledge. If she knew what she was talking about she would have known that mushrooms have been popular every year since Tim Leary first brought word of the mushrooms to the doors of Harvard University in 1960. And they ave been popular on every campus acround the world ever since and for every year.

 
My Comments about the top three news items

In a response to @Cro's post at the Shroomery: Re: Numbers for drug bust not accurate
[Re: @cro]
#2810557 - 06/20/04 05:24 AM>br>
You can all thank me for straightening out Jessica. IT was my letter to her about this matter that brought out this latest news Item.

However, she did not apologize for publishing incorrect information given to her by the local police and the DEA. And there are four thousand doses of acid in a gram so 25 pounds would be a lot more than a million hits. I was trying to copy the letter to Jessica from the Mycotopia site. I will look into my email folder and see if I have it.

mj

Hold on

Here it is but this reporter did not respond to my email whatsoever.

What a cold coward she is.

My letter to her of last week after this item appeared on the internet

XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

Mon, 14 Jun 2004 00:10:27 -0700 (PDT)
From: "J. Allen" Add to Address Book
Subject: Your Irresponsible Reporting of Mushroom Bust
To: langdonj@TimesRecordNews.com.


Dear Mz. Jessica Langdon,

My name is John W. Allen and I am the author of 9
books, one medical poster, 4 CD-ROM information discs,
including a bibliography of hallucinogenic mushrooms
(2700 published papers, 1700 annotations and 8500
cross-references), and more than three dozen published
papers in respectable scientific and botanical
journals on the subject of hallucinogenic (magic)
mushrooms.

Your recent two editorials on the bust in North Texas
and the party article are wrought with false
information, obviously supplied to you by both your
local drug enforcement task forces as well as by the
DEA.

Psilocybian home grown mushrooms contain approximately
10 doses per dried ounce of mushrooms equaling approx,
280 doses per pound. That would be the equivalent
of 7000 doses. Not the far-fetched amount you quoted
in your article or what the law enforcement idiots told you. Printing false information is disgusting.

Those mushrooms basically have a street value of $20.00
to $35.00 per dose (1/8) of a dried ounce or one ounce
fresh.

One fresh pound of Psilocybe cubensis, the mushrooms
in question, dry to approximately one dried ounce. A
dried ounce of those mushrooms sells for anywhere from
$60.00 to $100.00 dollars per dried ounce.

One dried pound of Psilocybe cubensis retails to
dealers for the sum of $400 to $800 a dried pound.

At $800 per dried pound, that means that 25 pounds of
mushrooms would have a wholesale price of $25,000
dollars. Nowhere the false amount of a million and
above quoted to you and by you in your reporting of
this case.

To begin with, a clinical dosage of Psilocybe cubensis
is from 3-5 dried grams.

While one gram will give a mild inebriation, it is not
the high and the majority of users require at least an
8th of a dried ounce or one ounce fresh. The mushrooms
lose some potency in drying.

So I Am curious as to the sensationalistic
reporting of this incident over responsible journalism
from you by writing about a subject you apparently
have no knowledge of.

Also, you cannot get intoxicated smoking the
mushrooms. That is urban legend, a falsehood
perpetuated in the sixties by Carlos Castaneda in his
fictional book of Don Juan.

Additionally, mushrooms were only popular in the
sixties on the east coast with the Harvard Crowd and
students living in Florida to Texas where they grow
naturally in manure in pasturelands.

They were never available in the Haight-Ashbury or at
love-ins, Be-Ins, Happenings, etc.

And for more than 25 years I have lectured around the
world in many countries at many Universities and
mushrooms have been a drug of choice at a large
majority of schools of higher learning.

These police lied to you and to your newspaper and you are responsible or reporting their lies. I hope that
you will investigate these falsehoods and try to
correct the irresponsible report which you have placed
in the public eye. IF not, I will post these
incidents on my site with the many other news items I
have colleted and responded to over the past 30 years.

You would be most welcome to visit my online mushroom
website, the largest source of psilocybine information
on the web with more than 2800 photographs of 55 of
the more than 185 known species of mushrooms which
contain the chemicals psilocine and/or psilocybine.

Mushroom John's Shroom World

http://www.mushroojohn.org

My published papers

http://www.mushromjohn.org/articles.htm

Dozens of Mushroom related news items and a section on
Mushroom Busts around the USA, Busts of from 50 to
500 pounds. Again, false information provided to you
by these drug enforcement agents who are full of it
and my god did you fall for their story.

http://www.mushroomjohn.org/news.htm

Best regards,

John W. Allen
Visit http://www.mushroomjohn.org

XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

And she could not respond to my mail, but saw fit to cover her ass with an excuse of machinery failure.



 

The Navasota Examiner & Grimes County Review
Serving Navasota and Grimes County, Texas, since 1894
Friday, July 27, 2007

Pickup tells school students tale of betting the (King) Ranch on drugs

By STEVE SNYDER Examiner editor

That King Ranch Ford Grimes County Sheriff Don Sowell drives? He can thank Deputy Mike Clark.

That's because the truck came to the Sheriff's Office courtesy of a asset seizure and forfeiture off a crime worked by Clark.

He explained what happened a little over a year ago, March 27, 2006.

"I was working traffic on Hwy. 105. A truck passed by and appeared to have expired registration," he said.

So, Clark caught up to the forest green 2004 King Ranch and confirmed that its registration was, in fact, a year out of date.

Clark said that the driver of the vehicle, Shelley Stubblefield of Austin, appeared nervous while Clark was running his registration. So, Clark then had a check run on his driver's license for possible criminal background, and said the check showed Stubblefield had an extensive drug history.

Clark then asked for consent to search the truck, and got it. He said he smelled marijuana; it turned out that both a sandwich bag and a grocery bag in the pickup had marijuana.

So, he officially took Stubblefield into custody and began a full search of the truck. He then found the marijuana in the back seat.

Clark then got his drug-search dog, Sammy, a Belgian malinois. Clark took all the individual boxes and other items out of the truck and spread them on the ground.

He explained that, when Sammy gets a "hit," he usually barks or does something similar. That didn't happen on any containers, but Sammy did circle one box more than once.

It turns out Sammy just hadn't been trained on its contents.

Inside of an Office Depot box, Clark found what turned out to be about 8 pounds of hallucinogenic psilocybin mushrooms with a listed value of about $35,000.

After Stubblefield's arrest, the Grimes County District Attorney's Office began the process of asset seizure forfeiture. District Attorney Tuck McLain explained the process.

"Within 30 days of taking possession of property, we have to file an 'intent to seize' lawsuit," he said.

The lawsuit most allege the item was used in the commission of certain types of felonies, and must demonstrate that to win the suit. McLain said many such lawsuits are won through non-response by defendants; others, as was the case with the King Ranch, are won as part of plea bargains in the criminal cases. McLain said his assistant, prosecutor Andrea Bender, handled this particular case.

The seized item is then either sold at auction or else incorporated into use by the law enforcement agency making the arrest.

Given something of such value as the King Ranch Ford, with a new-sale sticker price of $44,000 in 2004, and questions of how much it might draw on resale, Sowell decided the department would be better off keeping it. Besides a personal-use vehicle, he said it makes a good "show-and-tell" item for events such as anti-drug talks at local schools.

Contact Steve Snyder at editor@navasotaexaminer.com.

 




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