Revised January 14, 2005; July 29, 2007; October 29, 2007; February 7, 2009; April 30, 2013; and April 3, 2013.
Copyright 1998-2017 by John W. Allen.



CLICK ON IMAGE BELOW TO ENLARGE




A Smart Shop in the Red light District in Amsterdam.



NEWS ARCHIVES


 
Hello and welcome to our News archives. In this section you will find newspaper clippings regarding the visionary mushrooms in the Netherlands. The first reference is from Zutphen and all of the rest are items related to mushroom use and sales in Amsterdam and Holland.

They are arranged alphabetically and then chronologically by dates. Information concerning the legal cultivation of magic mushrooms in the Nederlands can be viewed in an article of the largest magic mushroom farm in the world at: Fresh Mushrooms of Tiel



NETHERLANDS (HOLLAND)
Amsterdam


 
Reuters
TORONTO STAR

Saturday, July 24, 1999

Shopkeeper Has A Mushrooming Idea
In Dutch Town, Designer Drugs Are Delivered
.

Zutphen, Netherlands (AP) -- Want extra mushrooms on that

They'll get to your house as quickly as a Domino's pizza. But these mushrooms aren't pie toppings. They're hallucinogens, the latest Dutch treat in this country famously tolerant of "soft drugs."

Staying one step ahead of the law, a shop in this quiet eastern town is offering home delivery of herbal ecstacy, organic "designer drugs" and at least 600 other mind-expanding and mood-enhancing substances, including psychedelic mushrooms. "You might not want to eat them on a pizza because that could weaken the effects, but you can fry them up with eggs or set a pot of tea," entrepreneur Alex Krassenberg says.

law enforcement authorities in the Netherlands -- where marijuana and hashish, though technically illegal, are sold in small amounts without fear of presecution -- are taking a mellow approach. Dutch law doesn't prohibit the sale or use of the drugs sold by Krassenberg, but the government is reviewing its policy while researching the potential health risks. Although it isn't targeting mushrooms, a government task force recently proposed a ban on four hallucinogenic plants that are fast-acting and potentially poisonous if used in large doses. "We feel that a few of these substances should be banned, but there is no need for a witch hunt," says Benno Bruggink, a health ministry spokesperson.

Although so-called "smart shops" have already become a booming million-dollar business in the Netherlands, Krassenberg's store is the first to deliver to the customer's door. Most drop-offs are free within 20 kilometers of Zutphen, but for a small fee Krassenberg closes up shop, hops into his "mushroom taxi" and takes the goods to wherever they're desired.

Church towers jut out of the flat agrarian landscape surrounding Zutphen, set amid fields of flowers and bordering the Ijssel River. It's a rustic setting, one fit for an oil painting by one of the Dutch masters.

Krassenberg is clearly from another generation. His establishment -- Dr, Paddo, the Natural Drug Store -- is frowned on by fellow shopkeepers. Although his wares appeal mainly to the youth of the town's 30,000 inhabitants, he tells of making secret dileveries to middle-aged farmers to shy to visit the shop.

"This is a small town. They are interested in trying, but don't dare to come to the store," Krassenberg says. On a good day, Krassenberg makes up to 10 mushroom deliveries in Zutpen and surrounding villages. Each oerder cost 30 guilders ($15 U.S.) and includes home delivery. Out-of-town orders cost an extra dollar per kilometer. Krassenberg also sells natural alternativces to popular drugs such as speed, ecstacy and cocaine, encloses instructions and recommended dosages with the products he peddles.

North America and Britain have taken a much tougher stance against such chemicals by criminalizing their use, citing potential health hazards. Dutch authorities, however, say they haven't encountered any adverse social or health problems linked to the drugs. Zutphen's only hospital said it hasn't had a single complaint.

Even if authorities wanted to take action against Krassenberg's store, they couldn't because the subtances he delivers aren't illegal, says Tijn Brummel, spokesperson for the Zutphen police. "We don't do anything about it because it is uncharted territory. There are so many sorts...," Brummel says. "But we haven't had any problems and don't see any reason for a crack-down."

Krassenberg insists he's doing the partying public a favour. "Perfect alternatives like these should have been introduced a long time ago," he says. "They are reliable, non-addictive, and they don't give headaches or hangovers like the real thing."





 
Reuters
Friday, October 8, 1999
Web-Site URL: WEBSITE NO LONGER THERE
NewsHawk:Chuch Beyer

Court Says Magic Mushrooms Must Be Sold.

Amsterdam (Reuters) - The Netherlands' liberal drug policy suffered a minor knock on Thursday when a regional court ruled that drying hallucinogenic magic mushrooms was illegal.

But in the first case to target magic mushrooms, judges did not challenge the sale or cultivation of fresh mushrooms by more than 200 so-called "smart shops" across the country.

The court in the southern Dutch city of Den Bosch sentenced four men and one woman to community service for processing and trading dried magic mushrooms -- less than the one-and-a-half to three-year sentences the prosecutor had sought.

In handing out the lenient sentences, the court cited expert health research that showed the mushrooms posed no significant threat to public health. It also said magic mushrooms were not addictive and caused only mild hallucinogenic effects.

Under Dutch law, processing native plants into drugs is illegal, but selling or possessing the plant is not.

Three men were found guilty of producing and trading dried mushrooms, while another man and his daughter were convicted of growing the mushrooms with intent to process. The four men must each perform 240 hours of comunity service, and the woman 120 hours.

The smart shop in Den Bosch which sold the dried mmushrooms must pay a fine of 10,000 guilders, the court said.

At least one of the defendants, Hans Van Den Hurk, owner of the smart shop chain Consious Dreams, said he planned to appeal the verdict.

Smart shops sell an assortment of vitamin or herbal products, from energy drinks suchstitute designed to mimic the banned drug MDMA.

The Netherlands has long drawn criticism from other nations for its lenient drug policy, which tolerates the sale of Cannibis in hundreds of coffee shop.



 
CHICAGO TRIBUNE
Wednesday November 24, 1999

Crackdown -- Dutch Court Ruling Curtails Mushrooming Drug Sales.
By Matt Daily

Amsterdam -- Dutch smart shops, the 90's version of the euphemistically named coffee shops of the hippie era, could face a bad trip after a recent court oprder banning their most popular item.

Dried mushrooms, whose active ingredients psilocybin and psilocin, induce a mild euphoria or hallucinogenic haze, were ordered off the shelves last month in a case before a Den Bosch court designed to test the limits of Dutch Opium Laws.

But the ban need not spell a nightmare for Conscious Dreams, strife in Magic Valley or collapse at Inner Space, just some of the 200 psychedelic smart shops that draw thousands of trippers to the Netherlands each year.

The court decided against outlawing the sale of fresh mushrooms, the unprocessed and slightly weaker version of the same substances.

Its decision, far from clearing the mist surrounding the sale of the natural recreational drug, seems to have added a gray area to the psychedelic scenery.

Hans van den Hurk, opwner of Conscious Dreams chain of smart shops and a defendant in the case, said he would remove the dried mushrooms from his stores but continue to stock the fresh ones.

"Its clear that you're not allowed to prepare the mushrooms although it's legal to have them," saiys Van den Hurk, who is appealing against his sentence of 240 hours of community service, and "What's still not clear is whether you're allowed to grow them."

Other smart shop owners want to know where they stand.

"It's not clear what the final outcome will be. It's really difficult to give answers to our members," said a spokesman for VLOS, an association of Dutch Smart Shop proprietors. We've advised our members for several years not to sell the dried mushrooms," he added.

Van den Hurk opened Amsterdam's first smart shop in 1993 as a gallery that also sold "smart drinks": high-energy herbal beverages loaded with vitamines. His company started by importing the popular Red Bull drink at a time when the Dutch still banned the sale of foods with added vitamins. Since then there have been an explosion in the number of smart shops and the selection of mind-altering products they stock.

Conscious Dreams' Kokopelli store on the fringe of Amsterdam's Red Light District also features psycho-=active cacti, including peyote, once used by naticve American tribes to induce visions. As a matter of store policy, the cacti are sold only in their natural state.

No figures are available on the quantities of magic mushrooms sold annually in the Netherlands, But Van den Hurk estimated an average-sized smart shop would turn over $120,000-145,000 a year.

Dutch policies of tolerance toward the small-scale sale and use of so-called soft drugs such as Cannabis coupled with free marked forces have been the driving forces behind the surge in smart shops. But their rapid rise has also brought them to the attention of the police.

Conscious Dreams' Amsterdam store was raided in 1995, and the police carted off more than a kilo (2.2 pounds) of the mushrooms. After two years, however, the case was closed and no charges brought. Last month's mushroom case was the first to come to court and dates from a 1977 raid on a smart shop in the southern Dutch city of Den Bosch.

It's owner, Van den Hurk and theree others were arrested and charged with trafficking in a banned substance, a conviction that carries a jail sentence.

However Van den Hurk and his associates were able to walk feree as the court accepted research showing the mushrooms posed no significant threat to publich health.

It also ruled that the mushrooms in their natural state were not covered under the Opium Act although their active ingredients are banned. AS such the mushrooms themselves are not illegal, but processing them to release their banned substances is.

Van den Hurk, a former aid worker on a drug prevention program, believes the mushrooms are best sold in shops. "If you stop the sales now it will go directly into the criminal circuit because the users want their mushrooms," Van den Hurk said.

Customers at Kokopelli are unaware of the legal tussle over themushrooms but agree with Van den Hurk's assessment. "Taking the mushrooms is not something I would do very often," sain one Dutch woman, munching through a package. But would making the mushrooms illegal creat a deterrent to their use? "No, it's still something I would try, at least once," she said.



NEW - Dec 8, 2002



 
COURT SAYS MAGIC MUSHROOMS MUST BE SOLD FRESH

Friday October 8, 2002 - 7:05 AM ET
AMSTERDAM (Reuters)

The Netherlands' liberal drug policy suffered a minor knock on Thursday when a regional court ruled that drying hallucinogenic magic mushrooms was illegal.

But in the first case to target magic mushrooms, judges did not challenge the sale or cultivation of fresh mushrooms by more than 200 so-called smart shops across the country.

The court in the southern Dutch city of Den Bosch sentenced four men and one to community service for processing and trading dried magic mushrooms -- less than the one-and-a-half to three-year sentences the prosecutor had sought.

In handing out the lenient sentences, the court cited expert research that showed the mushrooms posed no significant threat to public health.

It also said magic mushrooms were not addictive and cause only mild hallucinogenic effects.

Under Dutch law, processing native plants into drugs is illegal, but selling or possessing the plant is not.

Three men were found guilty of producing and trading dried mushrooms, while another man and his daughter were convicted of growing the mushrooms with intent to process.

The four men must each perform 240 hours of community service, and the woman 120 hours.

The smart shop in Den Bosch which sold the dried mushrooms must pay a fine of 10,000 guilders, the court ruled.

At least one of the defendants, Hans van den Hurk, owner of the smart shop chain Conscious Dreams, said he planned to appeal the verdict.

Smart shops sell an assortment of vitamin or herbal products, from energy drinks such as Red Bull and aphrodisiacs to herbal ecstasy, a legal substitute designed to mimic the banned drug MDMA.

The Netherlands has long drawn criticism from other nations for its lenient drug policy, which tolerates the sale of cannabis in hundreds of coffee shops.



 
IN REGARDS TO THE NEXT POST: A NOTE FROM THE PERSON INVOLVED

Dear John,
The jpg file is a scan made of the EssenSie, a dutch smart magazine, it is a copy from the National Newspaper. But stil the same article.

I hope it is what you expected. Or else I have to study more on my English:
Eric



 
THE ARTICLE




 
THE TRANSLATION OF THE ABOVE NEWS ITEM

Free Translation to Dutch

Everywere shrooms from Wijchen
From a small room in Wijchen MeneerCactus spreads the spores of the hallucinating mushrooms all around the world. For scientific purposes only, but I cannot exclude people growing shrooms from them.

article by Jan Willem Narvis
Wijchen, Eric van Es (34) walks throught the silent street in Wijchen. Suddenly he stops at a small field. There are the famous red and white FA's. They gonna take you on a flying carpet, he lauchs.
Van Es loves nature. Especially the plants who had great influance on the development of human cultures. Like Peyote and San Pedro.
His cacti which he loves gave him the nickname of MeneerCactus.
Behind the window in a peacefull street the cacti are standing, on the table a bag of weed (backyard grown). Van Es likes gardining that much that he called his Cat Teunus Botanicus. Time he has plenty as he is a houseman.

In February he tried his first mushroom cultivation. After the cultivation he printed the spores. One print is a good for more than a life support of mushrooms. To much to keep.

Thats why he started the Free Spore Ring in Europe.
A website were people can get a print for 1 euro (covering Mailing costs). The website became very well visited. At the moment he already sent over 800 prints acros the globe. A lot to the USA and Scandinavia, but more and more often eastern to shroom lovers in Europe.
Even Hong Kong. Amazing that they were able to find me online

He does not want to make money with it. Else I would have driven a Mercedis Benz. Van Es has a hippie attitude, nature is free.

The shrooms he cultivates he shares with his friends or exhanges them for some growing supplies. And that when commercial growers earn big money. Money only brings troubles. My motivation is that every-one should be able to enjoy such a beautifull experiance.
He does about 4 trips a year.

The illegality of the mushroom he thinks is totally a waste of time and money. Will they ban all forms of pleasure?
BTW as long as he does not generate money he is not a criminal. And spores are free to sent, like flowerbols etc.

In Holland it is free to grow and sell (fresh)mushies, just like in swiss. But for the rest of the world mushies are illegal.
The prints are sent for research purposes only. What the peope do with the spores is not my responsebility.
When a Russian University asks for spores for research who am I do think it otherwise

Bla bla bla about our governement and the law thing that is going one for years about mushrooms. Fresh is legal, dry is ilegal! Drying is an illegal action too and will make it a hard drug. So only allow fresh mushrooms will not ban their export.

Van Es: When you lay down a mushroom in your room it starts drying by nature.
Is that illegal? Can they sent me to jail for 10 years?

Below is a article about research of our covernment to mushies. The work group containing politicy, law, police, health, are for liberation of the mushroom and asking for legal status!

Hope this is what you asked for . Enjoy
I hope you like it.....

And yes the dried mushroom is illegal even drying is. So picking is the start of drying proces. Well nothing changed at all. Typical Dutch freedom I guess.

Peace John,
Eric

NewsPaper: Algemeen Dagblad, 5 november 2002, page 2.
It is a national newspaper

I got also contacts from tv and radio. But I refused as they are comercial and only in for sensation.
 
Holland allows only fresh shrooms



In November 2002, the Dutch Supreme Court upheld convictions in two cases where the parties were convicted of manufacturing and selling dried psychoactive mushrooms.

The grower and the owner of a shop that sold the mushrooms were convicted in 2000 for growing and They were sentenced only to community service, but they appealed the case.

The Dutch Supreme Court apheld their convictions, ruling that only fresh mushrooms are legal, and they cannot be dried, ground or otherwise processed. Fresh mushrooms are still sold openly in numerous Dutch shops.

"This Supreme Court decision clears up the dispute for manufactured hallucinogenic mushrooms," said Leendert de Lange, a spokesman for The Netherlands Public Prosecutor's office in The Hague. "Now it is clear for us how we can deal with this issue."

"It is clear that dried mushrooms are forbidden," continued de Lange. "We are pleased the court has affirmed the stance of the Public Prosecutors office. I do not want to comment of the status of fresh mushrooms at this time."



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